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Events

Fall Foliage Report: October 2 – 8

I LOVE NY started the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 11 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November. Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Putman Canal Store

Reporting station: Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend: 40%

Brilliance: Average

Predominating colors: Oranges and yellows emerge with some reds still holding strong

Rating: Nearing midpoint – with the cold of October coming in, expect peak to move in quickly

More color is emerging and the midpoint of the season is approaching. As the weather becomes more fall-like peak season will be here soon.

The weekend is full of activities across the county. The Ames Museum will be open on Saturday. On the National Registry of Historic Places, the museum collection encompasses life in the smallest incorporated village of New York State along with the surrounding areas and local businesses.

The 28th Hagaman Art Show will be held on Saturday and Sunday from 12-4pm at Pawling Hall, 86 Pawling Street. Many area artists will be displaying their works. There is no admission charge.

On Saturday, the City of Amsterdam will host the annual Oktoberfest. The German themed block party on the Bridge Street will feature games, contests, German food, entertainment, vendors, live music, and Biergarten beer specials.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Fall Foliage Report: September 18-24

I LOVE NY starts the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 11 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November.  Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Aqueduct at Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site

Reporting station:  Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend:  10%

Brilliance: Dull

Predominating colors: Mostly green with small hints of yellow and reds (sumac)

Rating: Just beginning

The leaves are still mostly green but more color is starting to show through – hints of yellow and red are currently the main colors.

This Saturday, September 21, the Town of Minden will hold its 5th annual History Fair in Haslett Park, downtown Fort Plain.  There will be historical displays, demonstrations and exhibits by local residents, historians, and collectors.  Amongst the fun are an Old Tyme Movie Theatre, Old Farmer’s Market, scavenger hunt, and new this year will be the Chocolate Jumbles Baking Contest.  A historical walking tour of the village will take place at 1pm.  Admission is free.

The Ames Museum is also hosting their End of Summer Festival on Saturday.  Enjoy the fall colors, tour the museum, talk with and shop through the assorted vendors, 5K run/walk beginning at 9am.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Fall Foliage Report: October 10-16

I LOVE NY started the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 12 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November.  Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Erie Canalway Trail
Erie Canalway Trail

Reporting station:  Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend:  30%

Brilliance:  Average

Predominating colors: Still green with more red, orange, yellow coming out

Rating: Midpoint

This week has more color coming through with yellows and oranges and some reads.  It would be a great time to take a ride and see the fall foliage.  There are also many events happening on Saturday throughout the county!

The Village of Ames Museum will be open 9am to 3pm.

Celebrate the fall harvest and take advantage of your last chance of the season to visit Old Fort Johnson and the 1918 exhibit.  This open house features outdoor baking, fresh apple cider pressing and other family activities. Free admission all day, donations are always welcome.  The event is 10am-4pm.

Erie Canalway Trail
Erie Canalway Trail

From 11am-4pm, the Glen Conservancy and the 77th NY Regimental Balladeers will host Harvest Fest in the hamlet of Glen.  Events will take place in and around Conservancy Hall and will include activities at the Glen Cottage Farms, and at the Rustic Red House at the Glen Country Store at the confluence of Routes 30A and 161. Music, face painting, pumpkin painting, flower arranging, and more.

The Palatine Settlement Society invites the public to the annual “Afternoon at the Tavern.” This event is scheduled for Saturday from 1–4pm, and will be held at the historic 1747 Nellis Tavern in St. Johnsville.

There will be a variety of beer and cider provided by Wolf Hollow and Rogers Cidery. Soup and bread will also be served. Tickets, available in advance, are $15 per person with a limited number of tickets available at the door.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Fall Foliage Report: September 26 – October 2

I LOVE NY starts the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 12 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November.  Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Reporting station: Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter 

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend:  11%

Brilliance: Average

Predominating colors: Mostly green hints of Orange

Rating: beginning stages

The leaves are beginning to change in Montgomery County.  While green is still predominant, there are touches orange, yellow and red.

pic

The calendar is full of events including live music, historic celebrations, and agricultural events.  The Ames Museum is celebrating the end of summer and the 1747 Nellis Tavern is open for tours through September.

On Saturday, September 29th Fort Klock Historic Restoration’s 18th century Revolutionary war living history event will be happening! Interrupted Harvest 1778 the raids begin10:00 AM04:00 PM.

Also, the Schoharie River  Center in Esperance, will be hosting the Square and Contradance, a lively evening of dancing! Catskills caller, Peter Blue, will call this square and contra dance in the SRC Cultural Center. Live music by Erik House, Kathy Shimberg, and Ira McIntosh.

The 2nd Annual OktoberFest Block Party will be held on Saturday, October 6th on Amsterdam’s Southside! Food, German music, and of course beer! Fall treats and goodies for sale, games all day, food and craft vendors, and more.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Fall Foliage Report: September 19 – 25

I LOVE NY starts the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 12 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November.  Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Reporting station: Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter and Down by the River Kayak Rentals, Amsterdam

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend:  10%

Brilliance: Average

Predominating colors: Mostly green hints of yellow and red

Rating: Just beginning

The leaves are just beginning to change in Montgomery County.  While green is still predominant, there are touches of red and yellow.

The calendar is full of events including live music, historic celebrations, and agricultural events.  The Ames Museum is celebrating the end of summer and the 1747 Nellis Tavern is open for tours through September.

Mont. Co. Foliage Blog

On Sunday, September 22 there are a few great events happening.

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site is teaming up with Down by the River Kayak Rentals to host introductory kayaking lessons for children. These courses are intended for beginner or novice level paddlers ages 14 to 17.  Audrey Egelston of Down by the River Kayak Rentals will facilitate the two-hour introductory sessions.  Space is limited and pre-registration is required for this free program.

In Canajoharie, Montgomery County Historian/RMO Kelly Yacobucci Farquhar will lead a walking tour of the Village of Canajoharie on Saturday, September 22 at 11 am. The tour will highlight various sites associated with the African Americans who lived in Canajoharie during the 19th century as well as potential abolitionist activity. Brochures will identify the sites on a map of the Village of Canajoharie and the walking tour will include a portion of the sites, not all, but the brochures/maps will be available long after the walking tour. For more information please contact: Jenna Peterson Riley | (518) 673-2314.

At Old Fort Johnson the Annual Fall Fundraiser will be held from 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM. Featuring a sampler of the county’s best homemade soups, breads and pies. Enjoy amazing regional cooking while supporting the preservation of Old Fort Johnson. Limited seating, advance tickets recommended.$25 adults, $10 children includes unlimited soup samples, bread, pie, beverage and a special limited edition commemorative mug. Held rain or shine under tents in our beautiful gardens.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Fall Foliage Report: September 12-18

I LOVE NY starts the “New York Fall Foliage Report” on September 12 and will continue until the end of the foliage season, around the first or second week in November.  Montgomery County has started its own annual report this year as well.

Reporting station:  Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, Fort Hunter and Down by the River Kayak Rentals, Amsterdam

Percent of trees predicted to have changed by the coming weekend:  5%

Brilliance: Dull

Predominating colors: Mostly green with some yellow

Rating: Just beginning

The leaves are just beginning to change in Montgomery County.  While green is still predominant, there are touches of yellow.

The calendar is full of events including live music, historic celebrations, and agricultural events.  The Ames Museum is celebrating the end of summer and the 1747 Nellis Tavern is open for tours through September.

On Sunday is the annual Sundae on the Farm located at Dykeman & Sons, Fultonville.  A specialty of this farm is their rotary parlor and a robotic post-dipper. Learn about these new technologies on the farm while having fun. There will be educational activities, food, different varieties of farm animals, and more. foliage report 9_12_18

On Sunday, September 22, Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site is teaming up with Down by the River Kayak Rentals to host introductory kayaking lessons for children. These courses are intended for beginner or novice level paddlers ages 14 to 17.  Audrey Egelston of Down by the River Kayak Rentals will facilitate the two-hour introductory sessions.  Space is limited and pre-registration is required for this free program.

Explore our countryside, enjoy our events, and take in the autumn season!

Call for Travel Guides and Specialty Maps!

1.800.743.7337

Underground Railroad Itinerary

Calvary Church in Hagaman – Historic Marker

15 Church Street, Hagaman

The Montgomery County Anti-Slavery Society was organized at the Presbyterian church (now the Calvary Reformed Church) in Hagaman in 1836.  This was the county’s first official stance against the institution of slavery.  Many local abolitionists were instrumental in organizing this society.  A marker is placed outside of the church signifying its importance in the anti-slavery movement.

Green Hill Cemetery in Amsterdam – Self-guided Walking Tour

23 Cornell Street, Amsterdam

Abolitionism and African American Life in Amsterdam: Amsterdam, referred to by some as “the abolition hole,” was a hotbed of activity in the anti-slavery movement that swept the country in the years leading up to the Civil War.  Many of the local prominent residents participated in the cause to assist those seeking a life of freedom.  The area’s black residents also participated in the fight to end slavery with the Civil War.  A number of those participants, black and white, have their final resting place here at Green Hill Cemetery.

Canajoharie – Self-guided Walking Tour

Begin on Cliff Street, Canajoharie

The walking tour focuses on the sites associated with the African American residents and the anti-slavery movement in the Village of Canajoharie.  The brochure identifies sites with the village, those still existing and those that are gone with the passage of time.

James Mereness  – Historic Marker at Ames Museum

611 Latimer Hill Road, Ames

Dr. James Mereness participated and organized anti-slavery meetings for the western part of Montgomery County for many years prior to the Civil War.  Reports indicate that fugitive slaves seeking freedom from their lives in servitude sought shelter in Mereness’ home as part of the Underground Railroad network.  Dr. Mereness died in 1872, at which time, he continued his interests in improving the lives of African Americans through bequests to educate them.

The top floor of the 1835 Ames Museum, used as an academy from 1839 to 1959, houses many local artifacts featuring Ames’ hey-day as the hops-growing capital of 19th Century America. This building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.

For copies of the Green Hill Cemetery and Canajoharie tour maps and more information on the Underground Railroad, Abolitionism and African American Life in Montgomery County project, please contact the Montgomery County Department of History & Archives at (518) 853-8186.

African American Life & Abolitionist Movement in Canajoharie

A Walking Tour of Canajoharie

African American Life and the Abolitionist Movement in Canajoharie

Henry & Mary Miller (Cliff St.): Both born into slavery, Henry and Mary (Garlock) Miller were emancipated with the 1827 law.  They lived on this site where they raised a large family.

Peter & Eliza (Miller) Skinner (Cliff St.): Peter and Eliza Skinner represent the successful integration of many African Americans, born of enslaved parents, into the community life of these Mohawk Valley villages.  Both Peter and Eliza became property owners and successful business people in Canajoharie.

African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Zion Church (Cliff St.): Five African American men, representing African Americans who had been meeting for some time in a local church assembled to incorporate the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church at Canajoharie.  They purchased a plot of land on Cliff Street, just east of the home of Peter and Eliza Skinner.  Whether or not they actually built a church there is not known.  This church incorporated in 1857.  The denomination was synonymous with notable abolitionists such as Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Rev. Jermaine Loguen.  Rev. Richard Eastup, a freedom seeker himself, was appointed to oversee the Canajoharie mission church i 1862.

Charles Walter & Frances (Skinner) Denning (Cliff St.): Built sometime after 1868, this house was the home of Walter and Frances Denning, African Americans, by 1905.  Walter Denning was a Civil War veteran who became a prominent mason and brick worker in Canajoharie, who most likely used limestone quarried near this house.  Denning’s father actively shepherded freedom seekers from his home near Elmira.  Frances Skinner Denning grew up with her parents in a house just east on Cliff Street.

Philip Phillips (corner of Wheeler & Otsego Streets): As the generation of African Americans who were once enslaved, Philip and Eunice Phillips represent the modest success that steady work and home ownership provided to people who spanned the experience of both slavery and freedom in the Mohawk Valley in the mid-nineteenth century.

Canajoharie Academy (Otsego St.): As headmistress of the female department, Susan B. Anthony taught from 1846-1849 in the building that stood on this spot.  One cousin called her “the smartest woman in Canajoharie.”  Here she began her public career as a reformer, when she gave her first lecture for temperance on March 2, 1849.  She resigned in 1849 to move to Rochester, where she lived with her parents and began her career in abolitionism and women’s rights.  The current structure was designed by Archimedes Russell and built in 1892.

Ehle Block (Rock & Cliff Streets): erected 1876 by Eliza Ehle replacing an earlier home that had burned; housed various businesses including Peter Skinner’s barbershop and his wife Eliza Skinner’s ice cream parlor.

Reformed Church (Front St.): Like many churches in Montgomery County, European Americans dominated this congregation, but many African Americans  were also members.  Philip Phillips and his wife Eunice Van Horn Phillips were both members of this church; Philip Phillips was also sexton.

United Methodist Church: organized in 1828 in Palatine Bridge; built on this site in 1841; new structure erected after 1915 fire; had antislavery lectures including former slave Henry Walton Bibb. Many black families had their children baptized here.

John C. Smith: As a teacher and later President of the Canajoharie National Bank, Smith was one of those Canajoharie residents who, in 1850, signed and sent a petition to Congress denouncing slavery and forbade further admittance of any slave state to the Union.

Shaper Block (northwest corner of Church & Mohawk Streets): first building burned 1891; housed the barbershop of James Teboet.  The second building on this site, constructed of brick, burned and was razed in 1973.

George & Eleanor (Read) Caldwell (Mohawk St.): Susan B. Anthony first stayed at the home of her cousin Eleanor (Read) and George Caldwell during her tenure at the Canajoharie Academy.  As a conservative Democrat, George Caldwell introduced Anthony to local and state wide political debates, helping Anthony to define her own commitment to abolitionism.

James & Sarah Teboet/John & Mary Cromwell (Mohawk St.): James Teboet learned the skill to be a barber and practiced his trade in the Sharper building just down the street to the east of his home.  John Cromwell, residing in the same house, learned to play the violin while a slave in Schoharie County.  Hi s orchestra was well known throughout the Mohawk Valley playing at many halls and events.

Chester “Bromley” & Lizzie (Phillips) Hoke (Mohawk St.): Bromley Hoke and Elizabeth Phillips Hoke represent the integral part of that African Americans, descendants of grandparents who had been locally enslaved, played in the economic and social development of the Mohawk Valley, as well as the close ties of family and neighborhood that sustained African American families as they moved from slavery into freedom.

George Gilbert (Mohawk St.): Gilbert worked as a teamster and served as trustee for the A.M.E. Zion Church during its incorporation and its dissolution.  Also a member of the St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Gilbert was a prominent member of Canajoharie’s black residents.

For a copy of the Canajoharie tour map and more information on the Underground Railroad, Abolitionism and African American Life in Montgomery County project, please contact the Montgomery County Department of History & Archives at (518) 853-8186.